Sibbald Point Provincial Park

ALWAYS check Alerts and other information on the official website, as conditions and facility availability are subject to change.

OwenX, CC BY-SA 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Located on the Southern Shore of Lake Simcoe, this is a popular park and is only a 90-minute drive from downtown Toronto. Make sure you book the day-use permit in advance and remember there’s a 14-day maximum stay rule that is in effect for the high season. There’s more about this in the News section below.

News

Day Use Vehicle Permits: because of the popularity of this park, it’s one that may need permits to be purchased in advance in order to guarantee park access. This was started in 2021 and continued in 2022. There’s no reason to believe that this will be kept for 2023.
If you’re smart, grab the permit before any visit, even mid-week. We found this out the hard way at our local Provincial Park.
You can buy the vehicle permit up to 5 days in advance, which guarantees you access to the park on that day. If you have an annual or season pass, you should still book your permit online, but there’s no extra charge.

New Camping Rules for 2023 (14-night max) – new for 2023 are revised rules about the maximum number of nights you can camp. In this park, if you are camping between July 1 and the Saturday of the Labour Day long weekend, you’ll be restricted to no more than 14-nights at this park. Outside of those dates, it’s still the old 23-night maximum. Ontario Parks promises this will be clear when booking.
Rules for backcountry camping and the roofed accommodation haven’t changed.

Facebook and Website Links

Sibbald Point Park Patch Ontario Provincial Park

Sibbald Point Official website
Sibbald Point Official Twitter
Sibbald Point Facebook

Information

Phone #: (905) 722-8061
Main entrance coordinates: Latitude: 44.3217 Longitude: -79.3250
Address: 26071 York Rd 18 (Park Road) Sutton West L0E 1R0
Opening seasons: May 12, 2023 to October 10, 2023

The main park gate is now closed for the season (2022). However, leaving your vehicle outside the park and accessing trails on foot may be possible. Confirming this with the park office would be worthwhile if you travel a long distance. You should be aware that there will be no open facilities and limited staffing.

Park Winter access: in 2020, we asked Ontario Parks about park access out of season when most parks are officially closed. Their reply – “Parks that are closed for the season, and non-operational parks, are gated and access is available by foot. Visitors are permitted to park outside the gates and walk in for day use activities, such as hiking, fishing and picnicking. Please note that all buildings and facilities will be closed, and there is no consistent staff presence to oversee actions in the park.”

Activities

Camping & Accommodation

Car Camping

If you’re looking for the perfect camping spot, look no further than Sibbald Point. This town offers 10 different campgrounds with both electrical and non-electrical sites available to rent!

Group Camping

The campground has six sites to accommodate a 15-minute walk from each other. Vault toilets and water taps are available on-site, as well! You’ll love spending time at the beach or taking care of your needs in this discomfort zone – it’s so close by that you can go straight over after getting done hiking around outside all day long (or whatever).

Reservations can be made online or by phone.

Radio-Free Camping

Sites #200-381, #402 – 440, #501-586, and the Group Camping Area are audio device-free zones.

Hiking, Biking & Paddling

Hiking

Maidenhair Fern Trail 2.0 km, 1-1.5 hours, easy
The trail at Sibbald Point has something for everyone! Get ready to explore the many ecosystems that make up this unique landscape. Pick up your brochure from one of three locations and get started on an adventure you won’t want to end too soon.

The Cultural History of Sibbald Point Provincial Park 1.0 km, 1-2 hours, easy
This walk explores the rich history of the Sibbald Family through an interpretive guidebook. Park visitors will explore the Eildon Hall Museum (Sibbald Family Estate Home (ca. 1836), the settler’s cabin, a walk down “The Avenue,” St. George’s Anglican Church (ca.1877), and graveyard, which is the burial site of famous Canadian authors Stephen Butler Leacock and Mazo de la Roche.

Biking

The great thing about cycling on park roads is how easy it makes access to all of your favorite parks. Tour some local Hedge Road along the Lake Simcoe waterfront if you’re up for a scenic ride!

Paddling

Paddlers should be aware that the lake can get pretty wild, and it is recommended to stay close to shore.

Winter Activities

The park is open all year round, and the main parking area and main park road are kept clear (as much as possible) to allow Winter access. Activities are not organized, but you can hike, snowshoe, and cross-country ski. The trails at Sibbald Point Provincial Park are not groomed, but you can get a snow condition report on the official website.

Ice fishing is also popular but check with local ice hut companies to ensure the ice conditions are safe.

Weather Conditions – if you are looking for weather information or snow conditions, the following list should help you.
Canadian Snow Research
Dark Sky
Environment Canada – weather forecasts, hourly forecast, and weather radar map.
National Weather Service – US Government, but it does include Ontario.
Open Weather Map
Snow Forecast – more relevant for downhill skiing.
The Weather Network has lots of ads, but you get 7 and 14-day forecasts. Snow reports from downhill ski areas but remember they do make their own snow.
Windy.com
We’d love to hear from you if you have any other suggestions – please message us.

Birding

Sibbald Point is a stopover point on the annual migration north in Spring and a corresponding southerly migration in Fall. Wild turkeys and Pileated woodpeckers are often seen in the area.

Maps & Resources

Parks Canada has a park overview map for Sibbald Point Provincial Park click here for more information.

Ontario Crown Land Use Policy Atlas: most Provincial Parks have excellent signage, maps, and marked trails. If you take up back-country adventures, then it’s not always clear. The Ontario Crown Land Use maps are an excellent resource. You might also want to join one or more of these groups on Facebook
Crown Land Camping Group
Crown Land Camping Ontario
Ontario Parks and Crown Land
Ontario Crown Land Campers
Sharing Ontario Crown Land Camping Spots

Local Facilities

If you know of a useful link, Facebook group, or resource that might improve this post, please message us through our contact page. We are always happy to include relevant local business information – just a one or two-sentence paragraph and a link to your website or Facebook page.